Chinese Reception of Magic Lantern During the Late Qing Dynasty: Study of the Name Change from Huandeng to Yingxi

Author

Jiayin Yu * 1

1 Goldsmiths, University of London

Corresponding Author

Jiayin Yu

Keywords

early cinema, media archaeology, magic lantern

Abstract

This paper illustrates the changing of Magic Lantern’s Chinese name after its landing in China. Magic Lantern, as an ancient precursor of the modern cinema, experienced a long-term development that plays an increasingly important role in our modern life. The change of its Chinese name shows the Chinese perception of this apparatus. People neglected the alternative paths of “cinema” when the cinema becoming into an entertainment stereotype for the public. This paper will look back to the beginning of the perception history of this apparatus, rethink the history writing method, and try to discover an alternative approach to understand cinema.

Citation

Jiayin Yu. Chinese Reception of Magic Lantern During the Late Qing Dynasty: Study of the Name Change from Huandeng to Yingxi. CHR (2021) CHR ICEIPI 2021: 57-62. DOI: 10.54254/chr.iceipi.2021216.

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